AI Gov National Security

AI Gov National Security

 
AI Gov: National Security
AI Gov: National Security
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Virtual event

Earlier this year, the National Security Council on Artificial Intelligence released its final report, emphasizing that becoming AI-ready will be critical to America’s national security. It will play a role in our cyber defenses, technological capability and maintaining a competitive information advantage. This event will dive into how we can unlock data and AI to drive the future of national security forward with key conversation with federal experts in the field.

Date
November 3, 2021
Time
11:00 am - 1:00 pm ET
Where
Virtual event
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AI Gov: National Security

Video Replay

The AI race is ramping up and the U.S. needs a strategy to secure its position as a leader in AI. Hear how the U.S. can develop an AI strategy to secure U.S. interests and lead the world in AI development.

  • Dr. Mark Segal, Deputy Director, Research Directorate, NSA
  • Moderator: Amy Kluber, Editorial Director, GovernmentCIO Media & Research

High performance computing can revolutionize the AI race by supercharging algorithmic computing power. Researchers and HPC pioneers in government will discuss how HPC can improve agency mission delivery and boost national security efforts. 

  • Laura Carriere, High Performance Computing Lead, Center for Climate Simulation, NASA
  • Tsengdar Lee, Program Manager, High-End Computing Program, NASA
  • Krista…

AI has the potential to change the way the warfighter engages in combat, but also the way nation-state actors and criminals attack U.S. critical infrastructure. AI leaders from DOD and CISA will discuss the ways AI is changing cyberwarfare and what the U.S. can do to fight back. 

  • Thomas Kenney, CDO, USSOCOM
  • Greg McCullough, Director, Cyber Artificial Intelligence, Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Moderator…
  • Clark Anderson, Security Solutions Architect, Presidio Federal
  • Moderator: Michael Hoffman, President, GovernmentCIO Media & Research

AI changes how crime, combat, and intelligence-gathering occur, so upskilling the federal workforce for AI is a national security imperative. AI leaders discuss how to chip away at the AI talent shortage and develop an AI-ready workforce to protect national security.

  • Maj. Andrew Armstrong, Chief of Data Integration, Kessel Run, U.S. Air Force
  • Diana Gehlhaus, Research Fellow, Center for Security and Emerging Technology, Georgetown University

Federal agencies often react to cyber intrusions, but malicious cyber actors have become so aggressive that federal agencies need to be more proactive in their cyber defenses for the sake of national security. Hear from CISA's Martin Stanley about what federal agencies should keep in mind when developing their cyber strategies, and how AI can help.

  • Martin Stanley, Branch Chief, Strategic Technology, CISA
  • Moderator: Kate Macri, Staff Writer/Researcher, GovernmentCIO Media & Research

Related Coverage

DOL and NASA are accelerating AI and data capabilities as they look to leverage advanced computing.
Artificial intelligence and machine learning capacities are allowing analysts to produce quicker, more streamlined assessments.
AI workforce experts highlight the importance of diversity and robust education development to foster a stronger AI workforce.
Use cases for the technology are enabling full national security protections across government.
Federal leaders discuss the challenges and opportunities around the technology for nationwide security issues.

Sponsors

Booz Allen Hamilton logo
Presidio Federal logo

Speakers

 

Clark Anderson, Security Solutions Architect for Presidio Federal, brings 25 years of unique perspective to Federal cybersecurity challenges. He founded a security manufacturing company, designed and supported security solutions for all branches of the Military, integrated International Coalition partners into US networks, and met the unique challenges of secure information sharing among agencies.

His current position with Presidio Federal is focused on researching the security industry and architecting advanced solutions for the special circumstances of Federal and Military customers.

His career in security began when he founded a small manufacturing company that built remote image transmission systems for federal and military clients. Later he traveled throughout South America supporting counter-narcotics programs and became the network manager for an interagency task force where he pioneered the joining of many state, local and federal agencies onto a single law enforcement network.

Clark was the Regional Security Manager for more than two years for US Forces North in Afghanistan and supervised a large Coalition Partner network expansion. He returned to Special Operations Command in Florida and oversaw security for the integration of the US BICES and NATO international networks into the SOCOM network.

Other assignments including Security Manager for the Air Force Cyber Weapons Program gives him a unique perspective into the challenges of architecting effective security to overcome the many internal and external threats in diverse federal and military networks.

Security Solutions Architect, Presidio Federal

Maj. Andrew Armstrong is an active duty Air Force officer and is currently Chief of Data Integration at Kessel Run, the operational name of Air Force Life Cycle Management Center’s Detachment 12. In his current role at Kessel Run, Maj. Armstrong oversees all of the data science and engineering efforts across the organization, which is a hybrid acquisition and software development unit that uses DevSecOps to deliver war-winning software capabilities.

Prior to joining Kessel Run, Maj. Armstrong was an Assistant Professor of Statistics at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), where he taught graduate level statistics and was involved in research around machine learning and astrostatistics.

Maj. Armstrong has a B.S. in Computer Engineering and Discrete Mathematics from Michigan Technological University, a M.S. in Computer Engineering from AFIT, a M.S. in Management of Technology from The University of Texas at San Antonio, and a PhD in Applied Mathematics from AFIT.

Chief of Data Integration, Kessel Run, U.S. Air Force

Laura Carriere is the High-Performance Computing Lead at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation. Her responsibilities include ensuring that scientists have access to the compute resources they need by managing the details required to keep a supercomputer, a private cloud, centralized storage, public cloud access, and the backend services up and running. Before that she worked as a Technical Project Manager for the NCCS for almost a decade. She managed projects ranging from science data processing, web visualization, data analytics, HPC benchmarking, and a centralized storage project. Previously, Laura worked as a System Administrator for other NASA projects and various universities.

High Performance Computing Lead, Center for Climate Simulation, NASA

Diana Gehlhaus (Carew) is a Research Fellow at the Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET). Prior to CSET, she was a doctoral fellow at the RAND Corporation, receiving her PhD in Policy Analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Diana’s research focuses on the intersection of tech and talent, including domestic talent pipelines in AI and other emerging technologies; workforce development and education policy; youth career and educational decision making; trends in employer hiring, recruiting, and retention; military and federal civilian talent management; and technology and telecommunications policy. Prior to RAND she was an economist and director of the Young American Prosperity Project at the Progressive Policy Institute, a policy analyst at the U.S. Export-Import Bank and an Economist for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She has an M.A. in applied economics from Johns Hopkins University and a B.A. in mathematics and economics from Bucknell University. Diana’s media appearances include CNBC, Comcast Newsmakers, Wisconsin Public Radio, Nevada Public Radio and the Richard Fowler Show. Her research and commentary have been featured in The Hill, USA Today, Fortune, Washington Post and the Harvard Business Review blog, among other outlets. 

Research Fellow, Center for Security and Emerging Technology, Georgetown University

As a direct report to the Commander, Mr. Kenney is the Chief Data Officer/Director of SOF AI for U.S. Special Operations Command. His primary duty is to accelerate digital capabilities for the entire SOF enterprise through collaborative efforts with Industry, Academia, DoD, and other Government Agencies. Mr. Kenney is a serial entrepreneur as both a Chief Executive Officer and Chief Technology Officer, with deep experience in start-ups and turnarounds. Over the past 20 years, he served on or led senior executive teams and corporate boards that have delivered nearly $3B in value to investors and shareholders through multiple exits via acquisition by private equity and Fortune 100 enterprises. Most recently, Mr. Kenney led companies and teams to develop advanced cloud computing applications that employ AI and machine learning techniques for systems that measure in the hundreds of millions of users worldwide. Mr. Kenney has over two decades of enlisted and officer experience in the Army Reserve and National Guard, including multiple combat deployments to Afghanistan and Africa as a Civil Affairs officer. He has participated in several multi-national exercises and taught civil-military techniques to foreign partners in Hungary and Poland as a part of NATO education programs. Mr. Kenney also serves as a technical advisor and board member within the DOD and industry focusing on developing cloud, data, and AI capabilities.

CDO, USSOCOM

Krista Kinnard is the Chief of Emerging Technologies at the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in the Office of the Chief Information Officer. In this role, she leads the organization’s discovery and adoption of new technologies and solutions to meet the unique business challenges faced by DOL agencies. She helps foster the use of artificial intelligence, machine learning, robotic process automation (RPA) and other emerging technologies across the organization in support of mission work.

Prior to joining the Department, Krista was a Director of the General Service Administration’s (GSA) Artificial Intelligence Center of Excellence, where she partnered with federal agencies to foster the adoption of AI and automation capabilities. She played a critical role in DOL’s standing-up of a robotic process automation capability for procurement and IT based processes. Additionally, she helped lead the Artificial Intelligence Community of Practice (CoP) for GSA.

Krista has several years of experience as a data scientist and technical project lead in the private sector, leading the design and development of machine learning based systems for government clients.

She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology, a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and Portuguese from the University of Arizona, and a Master of Science degree in Data Analytics and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

Chief of Emerging Technologies, DOL

Dr. Tsengdar Lee is the Program Manager for the R&A Weather Focus Area, the High-End Computing Program, and for NASA’s Data for Operation and Assessment. For the Weather Focus Area, he is responsible for the advanced planning for the weather research and development priorities. He is also the manager of the NASA Weather Data Analysis Program, focusing on the transition of research results into the operational forecast centers and the acceleration of operational use of research data. Two major activities include the multi-agency Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation and the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center. For the High-End Computing Program, he is responsible for maintaining the high-end computing capability to support the agency's aeronautics research, human exploration, scientific discovery, and space operations missions. Dr. Lee serves as co-chair for the Interagency Weather Research Coordination Committee (IWRCC).

Lee joined NASA in 2001 as the High-End Computing Program Manager for the Earth Science Enterprise. He was responsible for the Earth science computational modeling needs, primarily focusing on weather and climate modeling. Between 2002 and 2006, Lee also managed the Earth Science Global Modeling Program. He funded research efforts to study the global climate change, weather forecasting, and hurricane prediction problems.

Prior to 2001, Lee held positions as Senior Technical Advisor with Northrop Grumman Information Technology and Senior Staff Engineer with Litton PRC. He worked on the Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS) project for the National Weather Service. He was responsible for the rapid development, integration, and commercialization of the AWIPS client-server system. Lee also was a principal engineer on the effort to develop the AWIPS network monitoring and control system.

Tsengdar Lee received a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University in 1992. He credits his training as a short-term weather modeler and later contributions to large information technology (IT) projects, including the National Weather Service's Advanced Weather Information Processing System, as guiding his present-day decisions.

Program Manager, High-End Computing Program, NASA

Greg McCullough is the Director of Cyber AI and Cyber Solutions at Booz Allen Hamilton. He has over ten years of experience developing cyber capabilities across the Defense market. Most recently, he has driven compliance automation and key cyber integrations across the Federal market. He holds a BS in Computer Science from Butler University, a BS in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, and an MS in Computer Science from George Washington University.

Director, Cyber Artificial Intelligence, Booz Allen Hamilton
Deputy Director, Research Directorate, NSA

Michael Sellitto is Deputy Director of the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence.

From 2015-2018, Michael served in the White House as Director for Cybersecurity Policy on the National Security Council staff. In that role he led international engagement on cybersecurity policy and strategy, promoted international adoption of a framework for strategic stability in cyberspace, and advanced U.S. interests on issues related to the digital economy and Internet governance. He also led international negotiations to develop cybersecurity partnerships, such as the Framework for the U.S.-India Cyber Relationship, announced in June 2016 by President Obama and Prime Minister Modi.

Prior to his work at the White House, Michael served as Special Assistant to Deputy Secretaries of State William J. Burns (2014) and Antony Blinken (2015), advising the Deputies on political, energy, security, and trade issues related to South and Central Asia and on worldwide cyber policy and counterterrorism strategy and operations. He served as the Coordinator for the 2015 Leaders’ Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism, chaired by President Obama at the United Nations in New York. Previously, Michael served as Special Assistant to the State Department Coordinator for Counterterrorism, supporting the Coordinator in the development and execution of the full range of counterterrorism strategy, policy, and programs worldwide, as well as in the conduct of bilateral and multilateral diplomacy. He also covered counterterrorism policy and programs in the East Asia and Pacific region for the State Department Bureau of Counterterrorism and served as a Political Officer on the State Department China Desk, where his portfolio included China’s bilateral counterterrorism and law enforcement cooperation and China’s external relations.

Prior to joining the State Department, Michael was a Presidential Management Fellow in the Directorate of Strategic Operational Planning at the National Counterterrorism Center.

Since 2016, Michael has been a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He holds degrees of Master in Public Policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and Bachelor of Science from New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Deputy Director, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, Stanford University

Martin Stanley, CISSP, is the Branch Chief for Strategic Technology at the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). Martin previously led the Cybersecurity Assurance Program at CISA and the Enterprise Cybersecurity Program at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Prior to his federal service Martin held executive leadership positions at Vonage and UUNET Technologies. Martin is co-author of Digital Health: Understanding the Benefit-Risk Patient-Provider Framework, published by Oxford University Press (March, 2021).

Branch Chief for Strategic Technology, CISA

Agenda

 
-

Welcome Remarks

  • Amy Kluber, Editorial Director, GovernmentCIO Media & Research
-

Fireside Chat: A National AI Strategy for National Security 

The AI race is ramping up and the U.S. needs a strategy to secure its position as a leader in AI. Hear how the U.S. can develop an AI strategy to secure U.S. interests and lead the world in AI development.

  • Dr. Mark Segal, Deputy Director, Research Directorate, NSA
  • Moderator: Amy Kluber, Editorial Director, GovernmentCIO Media & Research
-

HPC for Improved Mission Delivery & National Security

High performance computing can revolutionize the AI race by supercharging algorithmic computing power. Researchers and HPC pioneers in government will discuss how HPC can improve agency mission delivery and boost national security efforts. 

  • Laura Carriere, High Performance Computing Lead, Center for Climate Simulation, NASA
  • Tsengdar Lee, Program Manager, High-End Computing Program, NASA
  • Krista Kinnard, Chief of Emerging Technologies, DOL
  • Moderator: Sarah Sybert, Staff Writer/Researcher, GovernmentCIO Media & Research
-

The Future of AI and Cyberwarfare 

AI has the potential to change the way the warfighter engages in combat, but also the way nation-state actors and criminals attack U.S. critical infrastructure. AI leaders from DOD and CISA will discuss the ways AI is changing cyberwarfare and what the U.S. can do to fight back. 

  • Thomas Kenney, CDO, USSOCOM
  • Greg McCullough, Director, Cyber Artificial Intelligence, Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Moderator: Mike Dombrowski, Senior Vice President, GovernmentCIO
-

Industry Perspective

  • Clark Anderson, Security Solutions Architect, Presidio Federal
  • Moderator: Michael Hoffman, President, GovernmentCIO Media & Research
-

Boosting the AI Workforce for National Security 

AI changes how crime, combat, and intelligence-gathering occur, so upskilling the federal workforce for AI is a national security imperative. AI leaders discuss how to chip away at the AI talent shortage and develop an AI-ready workforce to protect national security.

  • Maj. Andrew Armstrong, Chief of Data Integration, Kessel Run, U.S. Air Force
  • Diana Gehlhaus, Research Fellow, Center for Security and Emerging Technology, Georgetown University
  • Michael Sellitto, Deputy Director, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, Stanford University
  • Moderator: Mike Ryan, Senior Vice President, GovernmentCIO
-

Fireside Chat

Federal agencies often react to cyber intrusions, but malicious cyber actors have become so aggressive that federal agencies need to be more proactive in their cyber defenses for the sake of national security. Hear from CISA's Martin Stanley about what federal agencies should keep in mind when developing their cyber strategies, and how AI can help.

  • Martin Stanley, Branch Chief, Strategic Technology, CISA
  • Moderator: Kate Macri, Staff Writer/Researcher, GovernmentCIO Media & Research
-

Closing Remarks

  • Amy Kluber, Editorial Director, GovernmentCIO Media & Research